Software

Why I Cancelled Evernote

February 3, 2017

Evernote is a note service that allows synchronization across devices. The concept is incredibly useful – edit the same note from many different places. After 2 years of using Evernote, however, I’ve cancelled my subscription.

There are a number of reasons that users were pushed away from Evernote, including a privacy policy SNAFU. The lessons learned from their lack of communication or proper wording are worthy of examination. My gripe arose when Evernote made a change to their subscription plans. Free users, once able to synchronize notes across unlimited devices, were limited to 2. In doing so, they made an important assumption: synchronizing notes across devices is what users will pay for. Free users received a downgrade, and asked to pay for what was taken away.

Finding a profitable model can mean losing users.

In building startups of my own, I’ve come across the problem Evernote undoubtedly faced. Users will use a free version, but how can you get them to pay? Tech companies have a lot of expenses: developers, servers, and more.

With that in mind, creating a payment model can be difficult. A freemium product needs to do two things, draw in and upgrade users. The free offer needs to be tantalizing, and the paid version needs to provide enough value to call for a paid upgrade. In my personal experience, their choice of what to charge for is not something I’m interested in. On top of that, their limitations to the free plan eliminated what I liked about the platform.

The meaning behind big decisions

What this shows is their trend away from customer-centric to a business focussed on revenue. Perhaps they were unsustainable, or perhaps they were pushed by a stakeholder. To be clear, this isn’t my gripe. What I’m saying is that while there are many things Evernote could have charged for, they are charging for something I would not pay for.

Evernote has the right to do this, and we have the right to switch services.

Evernote is well within its right to change its plans. There’s no faulting them for that. But that doesn’t mean us users have to like it! To be clear, I don’t feel entitled to Evernote’s services. However, if they expect me not to switch to a different platform, they should entice me to pay by adding value to the paid version, not taking value away from the free.

Many people are very passionate about the services they use – see the Cult of Mac, for instance. For now, I’ll be sticking with Microsoft OneDrive. The OSX app still has a bug or two, but it syncs across all my devices, has absolutely everything I need, and runs smoothly. Running smoothly is, incidentally, another thing Evernote is struggling with.

Love Evernote? Hate it? I’d love to hear your feedback!

 


Thanks for reading! Next week I’ll dig into a business topic – maybe user testing?
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